June 15, 2024

Art history professors study and teach the history of art, from ancient times to the present day. They may specialize in a particular period, region, or type of art, such as painting, sculpture, or architecture. Art history professors typically have a master’s degree or doctorate in art history, and they may also have experience working in museums or galleries.

The salary of an art history professor can vary depending on their experience, education, and the type of institution they work for. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for art history professors was $79,460 in May 2021. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $44,130, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $134,390.

Art history professors typically work in colleges and universities, where they teach courses on the history of art, art theory, and art criticism. They may also conduct research on art history topics, publish their findings in academic journals, and curate exhibitions at museums or galleries.

how much do art history professors make?

The salary of an art history professor can vary depending on a number of factors, including their experience, education, and the type of institution they work for. However, there are some key aspects that are worth considering when exploring this topic:

  • Experience: Art history professors with more experience typically earn higher salaries than those with less experience.
  • Education: Art history professors with a doctorate typically earn higher salaries than those with a master’s degree.
  • Institution type: Art history professors who work at private institutions typically earn higher salaries than those who work at public institutions.
  • Rank: Art history professors who are full professors typically earn higher salaries than those who are associate professors or assistant professors.
  • Location: Art history professors who work in large metropolitan areas typically earn higher salaries than those who work in rural areas.
  • Research: Art history professors who conduct research and publish their findings in academic journals typically earn higher salaries than those who do not.
  • Teaching: Art history professors who teach a large number of courses typically earn higher salaries than those who teach a small number of courses.
  • Administration: Art history professors who hold administrative positions, such as department chair or dean, typically earn higher salaries than those who do not.
  • Professional development: Art history professors who attend conferences and workshops to stay up-to-date on the latest research and teaching methods typically earn higher salaries than those who do not.
  • Awards and honors: Art history professors who have received awards and honors for their teaching or research typically earn higher salaries than those who have not.

These are just some of the key aspects that can affect the salary of an art history professor. It is important to note that there is no one-size-fits-all answer to the question of how much do art history professors make. However, by considering these factors, you can get a better understanding of the salary range for this profession.

Experience

The amount of experience an art history professor has is a key factor in determining their salary. This is because experience typically leads to increased knowledge and skills, which are both valuable to employers. Art history professors with more experience are also more likely to have developed a strong network of professional contacts, which can lead to more opportunities for advancement and higher salaries.

For example, an art history professor with 10 years of experience may be more likely to be promoted to full professor than an art history professor with only 5 years of experience. Full professors typically earn higher salaries than associate professors and assistant professors. Additionally, an art history professor with 10 years of experience may be more likely to be invited to give lectures and publish articles, which can also lead to higher salaries.

It is important to note that experience is not the only factor that affects an art history professor’s salary. Other factors, such as education, institution type, and rank, also play a role. However, experience is a significant factor that employers consider when setting salaries.

Education

The level of education an art history professor has is another key factor in determining their salary. Art history professors with a doctorate typically earn higher salaries than those with a master’s degree. This is because a doctorate represents a higher level of education and training, which is typically seen as more valuable by employers.

For example, an art history professor with a doctorate may be more likely to be hired for a tenure-track position at a research university than an art history professor with only a master’s degree. Tenure-track positions typically come with higher salaries and more opportunities for research and publication, which can lead to even higher salaries in the long run.

Additionally, art history professors with a doctorate may be more likely to be promoted to full professor than those with only a master’s degree. Full professors typically earn higher salaries than associate professors and assistant professors.

Of course, there are some exceptions to this rule. There are some art history professors with a master’s degree who earn more money than art history professors with a doctorate. However, these are typically exceptions, and the overall trend is that art history professors with a doctorate earn higher salaries than those with only a master’s degree.

Institution type

The type of institution an art history professor works at can also affect their salary. Art history professors who work at private institutions typically earn higher salaries than those who work at public institutions. This is because private institutions typically have more money to spend on faculty salaries than public institutions. Additionally, private institutions are often more competitive in terms of hiring, which can lead to higher salaries for art history professors.

For example, an art history professor at a private Ivy League university may earn a salary of $100,000 or more per year, while an art history professor at a public state university may earn a salary of $70,000 or less per year. This is a significant difference in salary, and it is important to consider when choosing an institution to work for.

Of course, there are some exceptions to this rule. There are some public institutions that pay their art history professors very well, and there are some private institutions that pay their art history professors less well. However, the overall trend is that art history professors who work at private institutions earn higher salaries than those who work at public institutions.

Rank

Within academia, rank is a significant determinant of salary for art history professors. Full professors, who have typically achieved the highest level of experience and expertise in their field, command higher salaries compared to associate professors and assistant professors. This disparity is attributed to several factors:

  • Responsibilities and workload: Full professors often undertake a broader range of responsibilities, including leading research projects, mentoring graduate students, and serving in administrative roles. Their workload is typically more demanding, which is reflected in their higher compensation.
  • Experience and expertise: Full professors have typically accumulated more years of experience in teaching, research, and publication. Their expertise and reputation in the field are valuable assets that contribute to their higher earning potential.
  • Grant funding: Full professors are often more successful in securing external grant funding for their research projects. This additional income can supplement their base salary and further increase their overall compensation.
  • Tenure: Full professors typically have tenure, which provides them with greater job security and protection against arbitrary dismissal. This stability allows them to negotiate higher salaries and benefits.

In summary, the rank of a professor plays a crucial role in determining their salary. Full professors, with their extensive experience, expertise, and responsibilities, typically earn higher salaries than associate professors and assistant professors within the field of art history.

Location

The location of an art history professor’s job can have a significant impact on their salary. Art history professors who work in large metropolitan areas typically earn higher salaries than those who work in rural areas. This is due to a number of factors, including the higher cost of living in metropolitan areas and the greater availability of jobs in these areas.

The cost of living in large metropolitan areas is typically higher than in rural areas. This is due to a number of factors, including the higher cost of housing, food, and transportation. As a result, art history professors who work in large metropolitan areas need to earn higher salaries in order to maintain a similar standard of living to those who work in rural areas.

In addition, there are typically more jobs available for art history professors in large metropolitan areas than in rural areas. This is because large metropolitan areas are home to a greater number of colleges and universities, museums, and galleries. As a result, art history professors who work in large metropolitan areas have more opportunities to find jobs that match their skills and interests.

The combination of these factors leads to the higher salaries that art history professors earn in large metropolitan areas. If you are an art history professor who is considering a job in a large metropolitan area, it is important to be aware of the higher cost of living in these areas. However, you should also be aware of the greater availability of jobs and the higher salaries that are typically available in these areas.

Research

Research plays a significant role in determining the salary of an art history professor. Professors who actively engage in research, publish their findings in reputable academic journals, and contribute to the advancement of knowledge in their field are often compensated more handsomely than those who do not.

  • Publication Record: The number and quality of publications in peer-reviewed journals are key indicators of an art history professor’s research productivity. Professors with a strong publication record are more likely to be recognized for their expertise, which can translate into higher salaries.
  • Grant Funding: Research often requires funding, and professors who are successful in securing grants from external agencies, such as the National Endowment for the Humanities or the Getty Foundation, can supplement their salaries with additional income.
  • Institutional Prestige: Art history professors who work at institutions with a strong reputation for research are more likely to have access to resources and support for their research endeavors. This can lead to higher salaries and better overall compensation packages.
  • Teaching and Research Balance: While teaching is a primary responsibility for most art history professors, those who are able to successfully balance their teaching load with a robust research agenda are often rewarded with higher salaries. Institutions value professors who can excel in both areas.

The connection between research and salary is evident in the job market for art history professors. When universities and colleges are hiring, they often seek candidates with a strong research profile. This is because research-active professors bring prestige and recognition to the institution, which can attract more students and funding.

Therefore, art history professors who are serious about maximizing their earning potential should consider investing time and effort in developing a strong research agenda and publishing their findings in reputable academic journals.

Teaching

Teaching is a primary responsibility for art history professors, and the number of courses they teach can have a significant impact on their salary. Professors who teach a large number of courses are typically compensated more generously than those who teach a small number of courses. This is because teaching a large number of courses requires more time and effort, and it can also be more stressful.

  • Workload: Teaching a large number of courses requires more time and effort than teaching a small number of courses. Professors who teach a large number of courses typically have to spend more time preparing for class, grading papers, and meeting with students. They may also have to work more hours outside of the classroom, such as during evenings and weekends.
  • Stress: Teaching a large number of courses can be more stressful than teaching a small number of courses. This is because professors who teach a large number of courses have to juggle multiple responsibilities and deadlines. They may also have to deal with more student issues, such as absences, late assignments, and plagiarism.
  • Compensation: In recognition of the additional time, effort, and stress involved in teaching a large number of courses, art history professors who do so are typically compensated more generously than those who teach a small number of courses. This is reflected in their base salaries, as well as in their opportunities for bonuses and other forms of compensation.

The connection between teaching load and salary is an important consideration for art history professors when negotiating their contracts. Professors who are willing to teach a large number of courses can typically earn higher salaries than those who are not. However, it is important to weigh the financial benefits of teaching a large number of courses against the increased workload and stress.

Administration

Within the realm of academia, administrative responsibilities often come hand-in-hand with increased compensation. Art history professors who take on administrative roles, such as department chair or dean, typically earn higher salaries than those who do not hold such positions.

  • Expanded Responsibilities: Administrative positions entail a broader scope of responsibilities, including leadership, management, and strategic planning. These responsibilities extend beyond teaching and research, requiring a high level of organizational, interpersonal, and decision-making skills.
  • Time Commitment: Administrative roles demand a significant time commitment, often involving long hours, meetings, and additional duties outside of regular teaching hours. The time invested in these responsibilities can impact the amount of time available for teaching and research, which may affect an art history professor’s overall productivity.
  • Institutional Prestige: Administrative positions, particularly at higher levels such as dean, are often associated with institutional prestige and recognition. Art history professors who hold these positions may benefit from increased visibility and reputation within the academic community, which can positively influence their earning potential.
  • Negotiation and Market Value: When negotiating salaries, art history professors who hold administrative positions may have stronger leverage due to the additional value and expertise they bring to the institution. Their specialized skills and experience in leadership and management can increase their market value and justify higher compensation.

In conclusion, the connection between administrative positions and higher salaries for art history professors is multifaceted. The expanded responsibilities, time commitment, institutional prestige, and negotiation leverage associated with these roles contribute to the increased earning potential of art history professors who hold administrative positions.

Professional development

The connection between professional development and salary for art history professors lies in the value placed on continuous learning and improvement in the field. By attending conferences and workshops, art history professors demonstrate their commitment to staying abreast of the latest research and best practices in their discipline.

  • Enhanced Knowledge and Skills: Attending conferences and workshops allows art history professors to expand their knowledge base, learn about new methodologies, and refine their teaching skills. This enhanced knowledge and expertise make them more valuable to their institutions and students, which can lead to higher salaries.
  • Networking Opportunities: Conferences and workshops provide opportunities for art history professors to connect with colleagues from other institutions, exchange ideas, and build professional relationships. These connections can be instrumental in securing collaborations, research grants, and career advancement opportunities, all of which can contribute to increased earning potential.
  • Career Advancement: Institutions often view art history professors who actively engage in professional development as being more committed to their careers and the field as a whole. This commitment can be rewarded through promotions, tenure, and higher salaries.
  • Grant Funding: Research grants are an important source of funding for art history professors. By attending conferences and workshops, professors can learn about new research opportunities and connect with potential collaborators. This increased exposure to funding sources can lead to more successful grant applications and additional income.

In conclusion, the connection between professional development and salary for art history professors is multi-faceted. By investing in their knowledge, skills, and professional networks, art history professors position themselves for higher earning potential and career success.

Awards and honors

The connection between awards and honors and salary for art history professors can be explained by several factors:

  • Recognition of Excellence: Awards and honors are a form of recognition for outstanding achievements in teaching or research. They demonstrate that an art history professor has made significant contributions to their field, which is highly valued by institutions.
  • Increased Visibility: Receiving awards and honors increases an art history professor’s visibility within the academic community and beyond. This recognition can lead to invitations to give lectures, publish articles, and participate in prestigious conferences, which can further enhance their reputation and earning potential.
  • Negotiation Leverage: When negotiating salaries, art history professors who have received awards and honors have stronger leverage due to their proven track record of excellence. They can use their accomplishments to justify higher compensation and benefits.
  • Grant Funding: Awards and honors often come with financial rewards, such as research grants or fellowships. This additional funding can supplement an art history professor’s salary and provide resources for further research and creative activities.

In summary, awards and honors serve as tangible evidence of an art history professor’s exceptional abilities in teaching or research. These accolades enhance their reputation, visibility, and negotiation leverage, which ultimately translates into higher earning potential.

FAQs on Art History Professor Salaries

Individuals considering a career as an art history professor often have questions regarding their potential earnings. Here are some frequently asked questions and their corresponding answers to provide insights into the salary expectations in this field:

Question 1: What is the average salary for an art history professor?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary for art history professors was $79,460 in May 2021. However, it’s important to note that salaries can vary based on experience, education, institution type, and other factors.

Question 2: What factors influence an art history professor’s salary?

Several factors can affect an art history professor’s salary, including their experience, education level, the type of institution they work for, their rank, geographic location, research productivity, teaching load, administrative responsibilities, professional development activities, and awards and honors received.

Question 3: Do art history professors with a doctorate earn more than those with a master’s degree?

Generally, art history professors with a doctorate earn higher salaries than those with only a master’s degree. A doctorate represents a higher level of education and training, which is typically more valued by employers.

Question 4: How does an art history professor’s location impact their salary?

The location of an art history professor’s job can influence their salary. Professors working in large metropolitan areas with a high cost of living often earn higher salaries compared to those in rural areas.

Question 5: Can art history professors increase their salary by taking on additional responsibilities?

Yes, art history professors who take on additional responsibilities, such as administrative roles or leadership positions, may earn higher salaries. These responsibilities typically involve a broader scope of duties and increased accountability.

Question 6: How can art history professors stay up-to-date on salary trends and negotiate effectively?

Art history professors can stay informed about salary trends by utilizing resources such as professional organizations, salary surveys, and networking with colleagues. Effective salary negotiation involves research, preparation, and a clear understanding of one’s worth in the job market.

Summary: Art history professors’ salaries vary based on a combination of factors, including their experience, education, institution type, rank, location, research output, teaching responsibilities, administrative roles, professional development, and recognition through awards and honors. Understanding these factors and staying informed about industry trends can assist art history professors in maximizing their earning potential.

Transition to the next article section: For further insights into the career path and job market for art history professors, explore the following resources…

Tips for Maximizing Earning Potential as an Art History Professor

For individuals pursuing a career as an art history professor, understanding the factors that influence salary is crucial. Here are five tips to help maximize your earning potential in this field:

Tip 1: Pursue a Doctorate DegreeEarning a doctorate degree in art history can significantly increase your earning potential. A doctorate represents the highest level of education and training in the field, making you a more competitive candidate for higher-paying positions.Tip 2: Gain Experience in Teaching and ResearchBuilding a strong track record in both teaching and research is essential for career advancement and higher salaries. Seek opportunities to teach a variety of courses and present your research at conferences and publish in academic journals.Tip 3: Choose the Right InstitutionThe type of institution you work for can greatly impact your salary. Research institutions typically offer higher salaries than teaching-focused institutions. Additionally, consider the geographic location of the institution, as salaries may vary based on the cost of living.Tip 4: Seek Administrative RolesTaking on administrative responsibilities, such as department chair or dean, can lead to higher salaries. These roles involve broader responsibilities and leadership, which are often compensated accordingly.Tip 5: Engage in Professional Development and RecognitionContinuously invest in your professional development by attending conferences, workshops, and pursuing additional certifications. Receiving awards and honors for your teaching or research can also enhance your reputation and earning potential.

By following these tips, art history professors can position themselves for success and maximize their earning potential. Remember, salary negotiation is an ongoing process. Staying informed about industry trends and effectively advocating for your worth are key to achieving your financial goals.

Conclusion: Embracing these strategies can empower art history professors to navigate the job market with confidence and secure salaries commensurate with their experience, skills, and contributions to the field.

Conclusion

The exploration of “how much do art history professors make?” reveals a multifaceted landscape of factors that influence salary expectations. Experience, education, institution type, rank, location, research output, teaching responsibilities, administrative roles, professional development, and awards and honors all play significant roles in determining earning potential. Understanding these factors empowers art history professors to make informed decisions throughout their careers.

Maximizing earning potential requires a strategic approach. Pursuing a doctorate degree, gaining experience in teaching and research, choosing the right institution, seeking administrative roles, and engaging in professional development and recognition can all contribute to higher salaries. Effective salary negotiation involves research, preparation, and a clear understanding of one’s worth in the job market.

As the field of art history continues to evolve, so too will the factors that influence salaries. By staying informed about industry trends and embracing strategies for career advancement, art history professors can position themselves for success and secure salaries commensurate with their valuable contributions to academia and the broader community.


Unveiling the Financial Canvas: Exploring Art History Professor Salaries